Planting of Snowdrops “in the green”

Planting of Snowdrops “in the green”

Although the weather this week hasn’t been the best, there are signs that Spring is on its way, and one of the first signs of Spring is often the appearance of Snowdrops!

Snowdrops are on the Snowdrops CITES (the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora) list of plants. You should always buy Snowdrops from a reliable stockist.

Recently we purchased some “Snowdrops in the green” to plant alongside some established bulbs for a client where we felt that they needed some extra, more mature plants.

“Snowdrops in the green” are snowdrops that have been lifted from the ground while they are still in leaf, but the flower is about to go over. This is done because they establish more readily than stored snowdrop bulbs.

If you’re thinking of planting these kinds of Snowdrops then it’s important to handle the plants carefully when transplanting and to plant them as soon as you get them, in order to to stop any deterioration, You should definitely do this within 72 hrs of delivery.

Sometimes, Snowdrops can be quite tricky to get established. They don’t always come up in the first year and they are an expensive bulb to buy.

We planted 2000 bulbs back in November in this area, but in order to ensure that our clients had ample snowdrops to look at this year, we also decided to plant to Snowdrops “in the green” as an extra, at our own expense, as we were not happy with the rate that the snowdrops were growing at from the current bulbs for this year’s crop. There are various reasons for bulbs not growing. It could be down to “bulb stress” or perhaps they have decided to stay dormant until next year due to later planting. So after consultation with our client, we decided to add more.

Here is Tony, demonstrating planting a clump of Snowdrops in the green.

 

Here are some guidelines for planting bulbs in the green:

  • Choose a semi-shade where the bulbs will not dry out.
  • Ensure that the soil is rich with well-rotted organic matter.
  • Plant about 75 bulbs per square metre, try and plant in drifts if possible.
  • Ensure that the bulbs are planted at the depth they were previously grown. The stalks will be white where they were in the ground. This is normally about 8-10cm.
  • Wait until the foliage has completely died back before mowing if they have been planted in grass areas.
  • Established snowdrops can be lifted and divided after flowering.

Take a look at a time lapse of our hard work planting Snowdrops!

 

If you are looking for help or guidance with planting bulbs for different times of the year on your property then please do get in touch as we’re always happy to help and advise, and we look forward to seeing those snowdrops appearing in the next few weeks too!